Youth Shut-Ins

Japanese


Shut-ins are a relatively new phenomenon in Japan and occur mostly in men. Shut-ins are often depressed young men who drop out from school and instead shut themselves in their room. They are often characterized as being anti-social, favoring internet interactions, having interests such as anime, manga, and computer games. These people have often been the victims of bullying, and because of the intense pressures to conform, some adolescents find it unbearable to continue being part of society. Instead, they decide to stay in their homes.

YouTube Preview Image

External Link

From: An Investigation about School Refusal and School dropout in Senior High Schools by Yougo Teachers

Summery: Cases of high school truancy and high school dropouts becoming shut-ins are expected to rise. This study tries to better understand the condition of truancy and of high school students that leave mid-term. In 2004,17,211 high school students were studied, with the help of special education teachers, concerning the number of students that are either absent for long periods of time (“absentee students”), refuse to go to school, frequently go to the nurse’s office (for non-medical needs), or completely drop out. The results show that 1.1% of students are absentee students, and are found to be most common in sophomores. Truant students make up 1.2% of the student population, with most of those students, 50.5% of them, in the same grade. The numbers of students that spend an inordinate amount of time at the school nurse’s office make up 0.2% of the student body, and their numbers were roughly the same in each grade. Student dropouts make up 1.2% and were most common during sophomore year.

Within this group of students – absentees, truants, and dropouts – some can be considered “shut-ins”. Truants as well as the dropouts’ 1.2% can be appropriately assumed to be “shut-ins.” Due to the high number of sophomores that are absentee students, truants, and dropouts, and, considering the length of time some students have been truant, the official number of dropouts will likely increase, as well as the number of dropouts becoming “shut-ins” to increase.

Linkography

“Hikikomori” Among Young Adults in Japan

  • A study describing the difference between traditional Hikikomori, those with mental disorders, and Hikikomori with High-functioning Pervasive Developmental Disorders (HPDD).

Hikikomori: Investigations into the phenomenon of acute social withdrawal in contemporary
Japan

  • A study done by the University of Hawai’i Manoa that investigates the origin of hikikomori and addresses how to define the condition of hikikomori.

About Shut-Ins

  • Talks about what “shut-ins” are and chronicles the lives of various people living as shut-ins.

Contributor Bio

Japan: Rose

Hikikomori (Shut-Ins)

YouTube Preview Image

Post Bubble Culture

JapanBefore the collapse of the Bubble Economy, Japan enjoyed a great degree of prosperity: they were secure, respected, and wealthy, and the future only promised more. However, once the bubble popped, all the dreams the future had promised left quicker than it had ever come.

This story is illustrated by the rose to the right. What had once been a beautiful and thriving suddenly withered, leaving only memories of what once had been. Japan was seemingly alone, as the praise for the “Japanese system” and its “economic miracle” was replaced by harsh criticism and pretentious “I told you so”s. As the future fell from their sight, something new appeared on the horizon: insecurity, fear, hopelessness, and anger.

Unsure of how to handle to new reality, some of society sought refuge in tradition, devoting themselves to education and then into work, trying to salvage the prosperous times of youth. Others, jaded by broken promises, decided to retreat from society, creating their own sub-culture movements through religion, otaku culture, becoming freeters, or, more drastically, completely shutting themselves within their rooms.

Hikikomori Linkography

“Hikikomori” Among Young Adults in Japan

  • A study describing the difference between traditional Hikikomori, those with mental disorders, and Hikikomori with High-functioning Pervasive Developmental Disorders (HPDD).

Hikikomori: Investigations into the phenomenon of acute social withdrawal in contemporary
Japan

  • A study done by the University of Hawai’i Manoa that investigates the origin of hikikomori and addresses how to define the condition of hikikomori.

About Shut-Ins

  • Talks about what “shut-ins” are and chronicles the lives of various people living as shut-ins.

Roberts, Olivia

Portfolio Page for Olivia Roberts

Bio (Japanese | English)

Video

Timeline (Japanese | English)

Linkography

引きこもりの年表

English | Japanese

引きこもり

1970s-1980s (昭和 45 – 55): 日本には中途退学の高校生が増えている

Mid 1980s (昭和 55): 斉藤環は嬾惰な患者の増加に気付く(引きこもり)。

1988 – 1989 (昭和 66- 64): 東京・埼玉連続幼女誘拐殺人事件;、約二年で引きこもりの宮﨑 勤は四人の少女を他殺して、切断した。

十一月、 13 1990 (平成 2): 新潟少女監禁事件;十七歳の佐藤宣行、引きこもり、九歳の佐野 房子を誘拐される。

1990s (平成 2 – 12): メデイアでは引きこもりが社会問題として認められている。

五月 3, 2000 (平成 12):七歳の若い人はバスをハイジャクして、一人乗り手を殺す。

2000 (平成 12): 厚生労働省は引きこもりの場合の数を押される調査を行う。6151場合。

2003 (平成 15): 伊藤純一郎が引きこもりの現象と原因の大規模な研究で調べる。

2004 (平成 16):引きこもりの生活について「卵」という映画がデビュー。

Hikikomori Timeline

English | Japanese

Hikikomori

  • 1970s-1980s: Japan experiences an unprecedented high number of high school dropouts
  • Mid 1980s: Dr. Tamaki Saito begins noticing a rise in lethargic, unresponsive, anti-social clients (later termed hikikomori)
  • 1988 – 1989: the “Otaku Murders;” Tsutomu Miyazaki, a hikikomori, over a two year period, murders and mutilates 4 girls
  • November 13 1990: “The Niigata girl confinement incident;” 17-year–old Nobuyuki Sato, a hikikomori, kidnaps 9-year-old Fusako Sano
  • 1990s: Media identifies hikikomori as a social problem
  • January 28, 2000: Police find and rescue Fusako Sano from Sato’s apartment
  • May 3, 2000: a 17-year-old youth hijacks a bus and kills one passenger
  • 2000: Japanese Ministry of Health and Labor conducts its first official survey to determine the number of hikikomori cases. 6,151 cases
  • 2003: first extensive study on the hikikomori phenomenon and it’s roots are explored
  • 2004: Tamago debuts, a film that chronicles the life of a fictional hikikomori